Tag Archives: witch

10 Essential Home Remedies You Need To Know About

The following natural remedies are extremely beneficial and can only help your body function organically, as it should. These are remedies you might want to have in your house.

1.Carrot sticks and apples for whiter teeth 

Apples, cauliflower, celery and carrots work to whiten because they function as an abrasive scrub for teeth. These foods are nature’s toothbrush. They also stimulate the production of saliva, which helps keep plaque from forming. Stain sticks to plaque.

2.Lavender essential oil for stress relief

The soothing properties of lavender have been known since ancient times. When feeling anxious or overwhelmed, try some aromatherapy with lavender essential oil. This oil is also great for a soothing, stress-busting massage.

3.Cardamom for freshening breath

There is a reason for the Indian tradition of offering a bowl of cardamom seeds to guests to follow their meals. These antioxidant-packed little seeds, with their strong, refreshing flavor, can cleanse your palate and leave your mouth tasting great.

4.Yogurt to fight bad breath

Another fresh breath trick: plain, organic yogurt. The live bacteria cultures in the yogurt help neutralize the odor-causing bacteria in your mouth.

5.Witch hazel for cuts, scrapes and blisters

Pour a liberal amount ofwitch hazel over the cut or sore and allow it to dry. Add a bandage and you’re set. You can also use witch hazel on bruises or skin that is blistered or cracked.

Works just as well as rubbing alcohol, but is less drying on the skin.

6.Ginger for digestion

Ginger’s ability to settle the stomach is no old wive’s tale. This powerful rhizome is your first line of defense against upset stomachs and nausea.

7.Olives to help prevent motion sickness

For your next road trip, don’t forget to pack a jar of olives. The tannins that they contain can help to dissipate the first signs of nausea by drying your mouth. However, this remedy may not work if you are already ill; eat a couple olives at the first sign of motion sickness to help prevent worsening.

8.Prune juice to ease constipation

Treating constipation may require changes to your diet, including some prunes or prune juice can also help but it should be combined with other lifestyle changes.

9.Raw honey for disinfecting wounds

For minor wounds, raw honey can’t be beat. It has antibacterial, antiviral and antifungal properties to clean the wound, and also provides moisture and seals it in.

10.Onion for insect bites

To get rid of the itch of a bug bite, slice an onion in half and rub the juice right on the bite. The sulfur compounds contained in the onion work to neutralize the itch.

Thank you for reading,

Love and Light,

Eddie

Some information taken from:

http://www.nbcnews.com/id/44008827/ns/health-oral_health/t/eat-drink-your-way-whiter-healthier-smile/#.ViEXP_lViko

http://www.livestrong.com/article/472550-how-much-prune-juice-do-you-drink-to-relieve-constipation/

http://www.livescience.com/31977-homeopathy.html

C.G Jung – The Four Major Archetypes

The term “archetype” has its origins in ancient Greek. The root words are archein, which means “original or old”; and typos, which means “pattern, model or type”. The combined meaning is an “original pattern” of which all other similar persons, objects, or concepts are derived, copied, modeled, or emulated.

The psychologist, Carl Gustav Jung, used the concept of archetype in his theory of the human psyche. He believed that universal, mythic characters—archetypes—reside within the collective unconscious of people the world over. Archetypes represent fundamental human motifs of our experience as we evolved; consequentially, they evoke deep emotions.

Most, if not all, people have several archetypes at play in their personality construct; however, one archetype tends to dominate the personality in general. It can be helpful to know which archetypes are at play in oneself and others, especially loved ones, friends and co-workers, in order to gain personal insight into behaviors and motivations.

C.G Jung listed four main categories of archetypes:

  1. The Shadow
  2. The Anima
  3. The Animus
  4. The Self

The Shadow is a very common archetype that reflects deeper elements of our psyche, where ‘latent dispositions’ which are common to us all arise. It also reflects something that was once split from us in early management of the objects in our lives.

We may see the shadow in others and, if we dare, know it in ourselves. Mostly, however, we deny it in ourselves and project it onto others. It can also have a life of its own, as the Other. A powerful goal that some undertake is to re-integrate the shadow, the dark side, and the light of the ‘real’ self. If this can be done effectively, then we can become ‘whole’ once again, bringing together that which was once split from us.

Our shadow may appear in dreams, hallucinations and musings, often as something or someone who is bad, fearsome or despicable in some way. It may seduce through false friendship or threaten with callous disregard. Encounters with it, as an aspect of the subconscious, may reveal deeper thoughts and fears. It may also take over direct physical action when the person is confused, dazed or drugged.

” To confront a person with his shadow is to show him his own light. Once one has experienced a few times what it is like to stand judgingly between the opposites, one begins to understand what is meant by the self. Anyone who perceives his shadow and his light simultaneously sees himself from two sides and thus gets in the middle. ”

– Book: Good and Evil in Analytical Psychology” (1959). In CW 10. Civilization in Transition. P.872

Anima and Animus  are female and male principles that represent this deep difference. Whilst men have a fundamental animus and women an anima, each may also have the other, just as men have a feminine side and women a masculine. Jung saw men as having one dominant anima, contributed to by female members of his family, whilst women have a more complex, variable animus, perhaps made of several parts.

Jung theorized the development of the anima/animus as beginning with infant projection onto the mother, then projecting onto prospective partners until a lasting relationship can be found.

The Self – For Jung, the self is not just ‘me’ but God. It is the spirit that connects and is part of the universe. It is the coherent whole that unifies both consciousness and unconsciousness. It may be found elsewhere in such principles as nirvana and ecstatic harmony. It is perhaps what Jaques Lacan called ‘the real’.

Jung described creation of the self as a process of individuation, where all aspects are brought together as one. Thus ‘re-birth’ is returning to the wholeness of birth, before we start to split our selves into many parts.

Jung said that there are a large number of archetypes. These are often linked to the main archetypes and may represent aspects of them. They also overlap and many can appear in the same person. For example:

Family archetypes:

  • The father: Stern, powerful, controlling
  • The mother: Feeding, nurturing, soothing
  • The child: Birth, beginnings, salvation

Story archetypes:

  • The hero: Rescuer, champion
  • The maiden: Purity, desire
  • The wise old man: Knowledge, guidance
  • The magician: Mysterious, powerful
  • The earth mother: Nature
  • The witch or sorceress: Dangerous
  • The trickster: Deceiving, hidden

Animal archetypes:

  • The faithful dog: Unquestioning loyalty
  • The enduring horse: Never giving up
  • The devious cat: Self-serving

If you want to read more click Here

Thank you for reading,

Love and Light,

Eddie

Some information has been taken from:

Wikipedia

Soulcraft.co

C.G Jung Book: Good and Evil in Analytical Psychology