Tag Archives: mantra

The Mantra Of Transformation And Self-Empowerment

According to texts, the Om Namah Shivaya mantra bestows deep spiritual experiences and even boons (supernatural gifts).

The meaning of the chant is relatively simple:

  • Om- Before there was a universe, there was a vibrationless void of pure existence. Out of this void came the vibration which started the universe, which is known as Om.
  • Namah- This literally translate “to bow”.
  • Shivaya- This, of course, Shiva; but more than that, it means the inner self.

Personally, I’m not a big fan of anything related to any particular religion. However, I am a big fan of any creation that has the potential to awaken, inspire and soothe. As long as there is no attachment to the tool, as in not attaching our self-development to it, then using it can have some very beneficial effects.

As I listen and feel into this mantra, I can see it is a tool for self-empowerment, transformation, surrendering resistance and bringing our most authentic self to the surface. Simply listening or chanting it doesn’t do much, it’s like trying to drink water from a drained fountain.

It might bring a temporary feeling of growth, but the true lasting change always comes from within. So, alongside this mantra of transformation, use your own natural transformation skills.

Enjoy!

Thank you for reading and watching,

Love and Light,

Eddie

Lokah Samastah Sukhino Bhavantu: The Mantra Of Oneness

How many times have you taken someone else’s negative personality or rude behavior?  It’s so easy to get wrapped up in our own worlds, our own issues and forget that other people are fighting their own battles. This week, commit to serving the overall happiness and freedom in your community to committing to the mantra.  This week when other people get you down, instead of wishing negativity onto them, recite this mantra. By being a being of light, you are not only living in positivity, you are improving your karma and vibe. This is considered to be the mantra of Oneness.

“Lokah Samastah Sukhino Bhavantu” roughly translates to:

“May all beings everywhere be happy and free, and may the thoughts, words, and actions of my own life contribute in some way to that happiness and to that freedom for all.”

Let’s dissect the mantra:

Lokah: People or universe                                                                       Samastah: All beings living in the same location                   Sukhino: Free from suffering, centered in happiness                          Bhav: The state of unified existence or the divine mood                 Antu: May it be so, it must be so

In the expansiveness of this mantra – we all become one.  As we chant and our hearts expand, we contain and collapse into the heart of the Universe.  One rhythm that is breathtaking in its simplicity.

This mantra also calls us to look mindfully at our thoughts, words and actions.  Are we truly contributing to the happiness of all beings?  What does that look like in our lives and how can we expand it with love?

Thank you for watching,

Love and Light,

George

The Gayatri Mantra – Mantra Of Increased Wisdom, Spiritual Growth & Development

Gayatri Mantra (the mother of the vedas), the foremost mantra in hinduism and hindu beliefs, inspires wisdom. Its meaning is that “May the Almighty God illuminate our intellect to lead us along the righteous path”. The mantra is also a prayer to the “giver of light and life” – the sun (savitur).

Oh God! Thou art the Giver of Life,
Remover of pain and sorrow,
The Bestower of happiness,
Oh! Creator of the Universe,
May we receive thy supreme sin-destroying light,
May Thou guide our intellect in the right direction.

Gayatri, the five-faced Goddess, is said to have domain over the five senses or pranas, and protects these five life-forces of those who chant the Gayatri Mantra. In her role as the protector, Gayatri is referred to as Savitri.

Origin of the Gayatri Mantra

The Vedas are widely considered to be the source of all true knowledge, the word “Veda” itself meaning “Knowledge”. Gayatri Devi also gave to mankind the “Gayatri Mantra”, also known as the “Guru Mantra” or the “Savitri Mantra”. It is one of the oldest mantras, and generally thought of as being amongst the highest and most powerful mantras of all. This mantra is therefore often referred to as “the Mother of the Vedas”. In the Bhagavad Gita, Lord Krishna had proclaimed to Arjuna – “Among all the mantras, I am the Gayatri”.

Chanting of the Gayatri Mantra

The ideal times for chanting the mantra are three times a day – at dawn, mid-day, and at dusk. These times are known as the threesandhyas – morning, mid-day and evening. The maximum benefit of chanting the mantra is said to be obtained by chanting it 108 times. However, one may chant it for 3, 9, or 18 times when pressed for time.

Rishis selected the words of the Gayatri Mantra and arranged them so that they not only convey meaning but also create specific power of righteous wisdom through their utterance. Chanting of Gayatri Mantra removes all obstacles in our path to increased wisdom and spiritual growth and development. The teachings and powers incorporated in the Gayatri Mantra fulfill this purpose. Righteous wisdom starts emerging soon after Jap(recitation) of the Gayatri Mantra is performed.

The syllables of the mantra are said to positively affect all the chakras or energy centres in the human body – hence, proper pronunciation and enunciation are very important. Sathya Sai Babateaches that the Gayatri Mantra “will protect you from harm wherever you are, make your intellect shine, improve your power of speech, and dispel the darkness of ignorance (Dhiyoyonah prachodayaath)”.

Word for Word Meaning of the Gayatri Mantra

The Gayatri Mantra is unique in that it embodies the three concepts of stotra (singing the praise and glory of God), dhyaana (meditation) and praarthana (prayer).

Aum = Brahma ;
bhoor = embodiment of vital spiritual energy(pran) ;
bhuwah = destroyer of sufferings ;
swaha = embodiment of happiness ;
tat = that ;
savitur = bright like sun ;
varenyam = best choicest ;
bhargo = destroyer of sins ;
devasya = divine ;
these first nine words (stotra describe the glory of God
dheemahi = may imbibe ; pertains to meditation
dhiyo = intellect ;
yo = who ;
naha = our ;
prachodayat = may inspire!
“dhiyo yo na prachodayat” is a prayer to God

Significance of Gayatri Mantra as Prayer

The Gayatri Mantra occupies a unique place in that it has both the power of mantra and of prarthana (prayer). A mantra may be articulate or inarticulate, or a combination of them, as with AUM. It has an inherent power, known as “Mantra shakti”, which has a positive influence not due to any philosophical meaning behind the mantra, but simply due to its utterance alone. The Gayatri mantra has both an intrinsic power (ie “mantra shakti”), through its mere utterance alone, and also an instrumental power (ie “prarthana shakti”), which is derived from the understanding of its meaning and philosophical significance. Hence, the repeated and correct chanting of the Gayatri Mantra, with proper understanding of its meaning, is believed to be of the greatest good to the individual. (Details of each syllable can be found in the Gayatri by Words article)

The prayer form of the Gayatri takes various forms. The Gayatri Mantra is also known as the Savitri Mantra, in which form, it is invoked as a salutation to the Sun. The form that can be used to pray to Lord Shiva is called Rudra Gayatri. Similarly, one may sing Ganesha Gayatri for Lord Ganesha,Hanuman Gayatri for Lord Hanuman, and Saraswati Gayatri for Goddess Saraswati.

Source: eaglespace.com

Thank you for reading,

Love and Light,

Eddie

The Peace Mantra: Om Shanti Om

“Like many other mantras this one starts with the word “Om. It is considered that Om is the the original sound, the sound of the Universe of which all sounds come from. We can see it as an equivalent to the white light, in which it can be found all the colors of the rainbow. In the Hindu tradition Om is word of solemn affirmation and respectful agreement.

The second part of the mantra, Shanti, means “Peace,” that simple. It has a beautiful meaning and also a beautiful sound. This is interpreted as peace in the body, speech and mind (our whole being) or as a desire for peace individually, collectively and universally.

“Om Shanti Om” it is one of the Vedic Mantra which has got religious and philosophical meaning. Om is believed to be a sound of the whole cosmic manifestation. And Shanti is the “Peace”. It means ‘Om Shanti’ means peace for the all human kind, peace for all living and non living beings, peace for the universe, peace for each and every things in this whole cosmic manifestation. Hindus not only pray for their group or for themselves, they pray for every one and every thing and that is what Vedas teach us to do. ”

Thank you for reading and watching,

Love and Light,

Eddie

The Great Redeeming Mantra of Shiva: Om Namah Shivaya

Om Namah Shivaya is known as the great redeeming mantra of Shiva, also known as five-syllable mantra.

What it means:

It means “I bow to Shiva”. Shiva is the supreme reality, the Inner Self. It is the name given to consciousness that dwells in all. Shiva is the name of your true identity- your self.

According to Hindu mythology there are three Gods who run this creation. The Brahma-who creates the Universe, The Vishnu-who preserves the Universe and The Shiva-who in the end destroys the Universe. Among the three deities, Shiva, though considered as destroyer, also symbolizes the Inner Self which remains intact even after everything ends.

In this mantra, the chanter (the one who chants) bows to Shiva-his true self.

Om Namah Shivaya is a very powerful mantra. It has been said that if this mantra vibrates continually in your heart, then you have no need to perform austerities, to meditate or to practise yoga. To repeat this mantra you need no rituals or ceremonies, nor must you repeat it at an auspicious time or in a particular place. This mantra is free of all restrictions. It can be repeated by anyone, young or old, rich or poor and no matter what state a person is in, it will purify him.

Repeat “Om Namah Shivaya”, with the feeling that you are bowing to Shiva-your true Inner Self. Repeat this mantra with respect. The Inner Self is the form of God in you. So as you say “Om Namah Shivaya” – “I bow to Shiva”, you are actually bowing to God-the great almighty. The repetition of the name of God is equivalent to be merged in your very being. When you repeat God’s name in your mouth, in one way, you experience God itself. Just repeat this mantra with faith and it’s powerful phonetic vibrations will start doing miracles for you.

Thank you for chanting,

Love and Light,

George Kleopas

The Great Compassion Mantra Of Avalokiteśvara

What is a Mantra?

Mantra is a “musical instrument of thought”, manner of speaking, religious writing or speech,
a prayer or song of praise; a sacred formula came up to to whatever human god; an mysterious
poetry or charming method “occasionally embodied”, conjuration, magic spell, enchantment…

This mantra is dedicated to Avalokiteśvara, a healing deity, an Ascended Master and also a bodhisattva who embodies the compassion of all Buddhas.

Mantra Of Avalokiteśvara Lyrics:

Namo Ratna Trayaya,
Namo Arya Jnana
Sagara, Vairochana,
Byuhara Jara Tathagataya,
Arahate, Samyaksam Buddhaya,
Namo Sarwa Tathagate Bhyay,
Arhata Bhyah,
Samyaksam Buddhe Bhyah,
Namo Arya Avalokite
shoraya Bodhisattvaya,
Maha Sattvaya,
Maha Karunikaya,
Tadyata, Om Dara Dara,
Diri Diri, Duru Duru
Itte We, Itte Chale Chale,
Purachale Purachale,
Kusume Kusuma Wa Re,
Ili Milli, Chiti Jvalam, Apanaye Shoha.

English meaning of the mantra:

Homage to the Three Jewels,
Homage to the Ocean of that Superior,
Exalted Transcendental Wisdom,
The Appointed King, Vairocana,
The Tathagata, the Arhat,
the Pure and Complete Buddha,
Homage to All the Tathagatas, the Arhats,
the Pure and Complete Buddhas,
Homage to the Supreme Avalokiteshvara,
the Bodhisattva, the Great Being,
that Great Compassion,
Thus, Om, Apprehending the Deity of Sound,
Apprehending the Deity of Form,
Apprehending the Deity of Sign,
and the Surrounding Entourage.

If you want to read more on Avalokiteśvara

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Avalokite%C5%9Bvara

http://www.buddhanet.net/e-learning/history/kuanyin-txt.htm

http://buddhism.about.com/od/thetriyaka/a/avalokiteshvara.htm

Thanks for reading,

Love and Light,

George Kleopas

Om Mani Padme Hum – The Most Beneficial Mantra

“Om Mani Padme Hum” first known description of the mantra appears in the Karandavyuha Sutra (佛說大乘莊嚴寶王經/ The Buddha Teaches the Sutra of Mahayana King’s Sublime Treasure), which is part of certain Mahayana canons such as the Tibetan’s. It was stated inside the sutra, Shakyamuni Buddha said, “This is the most beneficial mantra, even I made this aspiration to all the million Buddhas and subsequently received this teaching from the Buddha Amitabha.” This text is first dated to around the late 4th century CE to the early 5th century CE.

“The Powers of the Six Syllables”
The six syllables perfect the Six Paramitas of the Bodhisattvas.
Gen Rinpoche, in his commentary on the Meaning of said:
“The mantra Om Mani Pädme Hum is easy to say yet quite powerful,
because it contains the essence of the entire teaching. When you say
the first syllable :

“Om” it is blessed to help you achieve perfection in the
practice of generosity,
“Ma” helps perfect the practice of pure ethics, and
“Ni” helps achieve perfection in the practice of tolerance and patience.
“Päd”, the fourth syllable, helps to achieve perfection of perseverance,
“Me” helps achieve perfection in the practice of concentration, and the final sixth syllable “Hum” helps achieve perfection in the practice of wisdom.

So in this way recitation of the mantra helps achieve perfection in the six practices from generosity to wisdom. The path of these six perfections is the path walked by all the Buddhas of the three times. What could then be more meaningful than to say the mantra and accomplish the six perfections?”

The six syllables purify the six realms of existence in suffering.
_______________________________________

The Kālāma Sutta, also known as the Kālām Sutta;
Sanskrit: Kālāma Sūtra;
Burmese: Kalama thoke or Kethamotti thoke
Thai: Kalama Sut, or KesamuttiSutta;
Pāli: Kesamuttisuttaṃ,
is a discourse of the Buddha contained in the Aṅguttara Nikaya of the Tipiṭaka.

The Buddha himself left us with completely different criteria for determining what is and what not real Buddhism from those of any religion is. If we accept Buddha’s words about his philosophy, it’s obviously won’t do to just look at history, even the most ancient strata.

“Kālāma Sūtra”
Rely not on the teacher, but on the teaching.
Rely not on the words of the teaching, but on the spirit of the words.
Rely not on theory, but on experience.

Do not believe in anything simply because you have heard it.
Do not believe in traditions because they have been handed down for many generations.
Do not believe anything because it is spoken and rumored by many.
Do not believe in anything because it is written in your religious books.
Do not believe in anything merely on the authority of your teachers and elders.

But after observation and analysis,
when you find that anything agrees with reason
and is conducive to the good and the benefit of one and all,
then accept it and live up to it ~

The sutta starts off by describing how the Buddha passes through the village of Kesaputta and is greeted by its inhabitants, a clan called the Kalamas. They ask for his advice: they say that many wandering holy men and ascetics pass through, expounding their teachings and criticizing the teachings of others. So whose teachings should they follow? He delivers in response a sermon that serves as an entry point to the Buddhadhamma for those unconvinced by mere spectacular revelation.

Thank you for reading and watching,

Love and Light,

Eddie